About the Reviewers

Roger D. Cook holds a B.A. in history and a B.S. in philosophy from the University of Utah. He is presently pursuing a M.Ed. at Brigham Young University while serving as a part-time faculty member in the Department of Philosophy. His academic interests include the Hellenization of Christianity, biblical studies, the Godhead in the Book of Mormon, and philosophy. Cook contributes regularly to Apologia, a monthly periodical of the Foundation for Apologetic Information and Research (FAIR).

Daniel W. Graham graduated from Davidson College with a degree in philosophy. He received a master's degree in classics from Brigham Young University. Subsequently he spent a year studying archaeology at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, then completed a Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. After teaching at Grinnell College and Rice University, he came to Brigham Young University, where he is now professor of philosophy. His main area of research is ancient Greek philosophy. He is the author of Aristotle's Two Systems (Oxford University Press, 1987), editor of the collected papers on ancient philosophy of Gregory Vlastos, Studies in Greek Philosophy, 2 vols. (Princeton University Press, 1995), and translator-commentator of Aristotle: Physics, Book VIII (Oxford University Press, 1999). He is a member of the board of editorial consultants of History of Philosophy Quarterly.

William J. Hamblin received his Ph.D. in Near Eastern history from the University of Michigan. Formerly employed as an intelligence analyst for the Department of Defense, he is now associate professor of history at Brigham Young University. He is the author of several dozen articles and professional presentations, has coauthored a textbook of world history, and is editor of FARMS Occasional Papers. His research interests focus on ideologies of sacred warfare and on ancient ideas of temples, celestial ascent, and deification.

Carl A. Mosser is a graduate of Talbot School of Theology, where he earned an M.A. in Theology, a second in New Testament, and a third in the Philosophy of Religion and Ethics. Currently he is pursuing further graduate studies in the Center for Advanced Theological Studies at Fuller Seminary in Pasadena, California. With Paul Owen he is the author of an important article on Mormonism (available from FARMS) entitled "Mormon Scholarship, Apologetics, and Evangelical Neglect: Losing the Battle and Not Knowing It?" Trinity Journal (1998). Carl's congregational affiliation is with Plaza Bible Church (Foursquare) in Orange, California.

Blake T. Ostler received a J.D. from the University of Utah. He has published several articles, including "Worshipworthiness and the Mormon Concept of God" in Religious Studies. He has also published in the International Journal for the Philosophy of Religion, Dialogue, and BYU Studies. He has published articles in books entitled The Gospel of John, Line upon Line, and Rediscovering the Book of Mormon. Ostler is a member of the Society of Christian Philosophers. His current interests include analytic philosophy of religion, medieval theology and philosophy, the philosophy of science, especially the philosophy of space-time and cosmogony, Martin Buber's existentialist philosophy, and Immanuel Kant. He currently practices law in Salt Lake City where he is a founding member of the firm of Burbidge, Carnahan, Ostler & White.

Paul L. Owen is a graduate of Talbot School of Theology, where he earned an M.A. in New Testament studies. Currently he is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in the Department of New Testament Language, Literature, and Theology. His dissertation is titled "Jewish Eschatology as a Matrix for Understanding the Death of Jesus in Early Christianity." With Carl Mosser he is the author of an important article on Mormonism entitled "Mormon Scholarship, Apologetics, and Evangelical Neglect: Losing the Battle and Not Knowing It?" Trinity Journal (1998). Paul's congregational affiliation is with the Buccleuch Free Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) in Edinburgh.

David L. Paulsen is a professor of philosophy at Brigham Young University. He earned an A.S. from Snow College in English, a B.S. from BYU in political science, and a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School. After practicing law for five years, he resumed his education at the University of Michigan, where he earned a Ph.D. in philosophy, specializing in the philosophy of religion. His doctoral thesis explored the comparative coherency of classical and Mormon theism. He has taught philosophy at BYU for the past twenty-seven years and in 1994 was appointed the Richard L. Evans Professor for Religious Understanding, an appointment he held until 1998. Paulsen has published widely in international, national, and local venues exploring the bearing of restoration revelation on issues in the philosophy of religion. He is presently engaged in writing two books: the first a philosophical/historical defense of the doctrine of divine embodiment, and the second Launching Conversations between Restoration and Non-Restoration Christians, which has the aim of increasing mutual understanding between Latter-day Saints and more mainline Christians.

Daniel C. Peterson is associate professor of Islamic studies and Arabic at Brigham Young University, where he serves as director of the Center for the Preservation of Ancient Religious Texts (CPART) and as managing editor of the Islamic Translation Series. The latter, distributed by the University of Chicago Press, publishes dual-language editions of classical Arabic and Persian philosophical texts. After receiving a degree in Greek and philosophy from BYU and following several years of study in Jerusalem and Cairo, Prof. Peterson earned a doctorate in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include the Quran, Islamic philosophical theology, and the roots of Islam in the intellectual culture of the ancient Near East and the Mediterranean. He currently serves as chairman of the board of trustees of the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.

R. Dennis Potter earned a B.A. in philosophy from Brigham Young University and an M.A. in philosophy from the University of Notre Dame. Currently a Ph.D. candidate in philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, he is also an adjunct lecturer at Indiana University at South Bend. The subject of his nearly completed dissertation is the philosophy of geometry. Potter has published papers on the philosophy of language and the philosophy of religion. He has a forthcoming paper on the philosophy of geometry that will appear in The Proceedings of the Society for Exact Philosophy and a paper on philosophy of religion under consideration at Faith and Philosophy.

James L. Siebach, assistant professor of philosophy at Brigham Young University, did undergraduate and graduate work in philosophy and classics, graduating with a Ph.D. from the Joint Program in Classics and Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. His dissertation focused on self-knowledge in St. Augustine. His current scholarly focus is the Cappadocian Fathers, particularly Gregory of Nyssa. Prof. Siebach has published recently on Augustine in the journal Augustinian Studies and on Plato in a collection of essays.