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To All the World  >  Native Americans
CHAPTERS
  1. Preface
  2. Key to Abbreviations
  3. Key to Scriptures
  4. Abinadi
  5. Allegory of Zenos
  6. Alma1
  7. Alma2
  8. Amulek
  9. Anthon Transcript
  10. Antichrists
  11. Archaeology
  12. Authorship of the Book of Mormon
  13. Baptism
  14. Baptismal Covenant
  15. Baptismal Prayer
  16. Beatitudes
  17. Benjamin
  18. Bible
  19. Biblical Prophecies about the Book of Mormon
  20. Book of Mormon
  21. Book of Mormon in a Biblical Culture
  22. Book of Mormon Personalities
  23. Born of God
  24. Brother of Jared
  25. Charity
  26. Children
  27. Chronology
  28. Columbus, Christopher
  29. Commentatries on the Book of Mormon
  30. Condescension of God
  31. Conversion
  32. Cowdery, Oliver
  33. Cumorah
  34. Cursings
  35. Economy and Technology
  36. Editions (1830–1981)
  37. Ezias
  38. Faith in Jesus Christ
  39. Fall of Adam
  40. Geography
  41. Gold Plates
  42. Gospel of Jesus Christ: The Gospel in LDS Teaching
  43. Government and Legal History in the Book of Mormon
  44. Grace
  45. Great and Abominable Church
  46. Harris, Martin
  47. Helaman1
  48. Helaman2
  49. Helaman3
  50. Infant Baptism
  51. Isaiah
  52. Ishmael
  53. Jacob, Son of Lehi
  54. Jaredites
  55. Jesus Christ
  56. Jesus Christ, Fatherhood and Sonship of
  57. Jesus Christ, Forty-Day Ministry and Other Post-Resurrection Appearances of
  58. Jesus Christ, Prophecies about
  59. Jesus Christ, Taking the Name of, upon Oneself
  60. Jesus Christ in the Scriptures
  61. Joseph of Egypt
  62. Judgment
  63. Justice and Mercy
  64. Laman
  65. Lamanites
  66. Language
  67. Law of Moses
  68. Lehi
  69. Liahona
  70. Literature, Book of Mormon as
  71. Manuscript, Lost 116 Pages
  72. Manuscripts of the Book of Mormon
  73. Melchizedek
  74. Mormon
  75. Moroni, Angel
  76. Moroni, Visitations of
  77. Moroni1
  78. Moroni2
  79. Mosiah1
  80. Mosiah2
  81. Mulek
  82. Names in the Book of Mormon
  83. Native Americans
  84. Near Eastern Background of the Book of Mormon
  85. Nephi1
  86. Nephi2
  87. Nephi3
  88. Nephi4
  89. Nephites
  90. Neum
  91. Opposition
  92. Palmyra/Manchester, New York
  93. Peoples of the Book of Mormon
  94. Plan of Salvation, Plan of Redemption
  95. Plates and Records in the Book of Mormon
  96. Plates, Metal
  97. Pride
  98. Promised Land, Concept of a
  99. Prophecy in the Book of Mormon
  100. Record Keeping
  101. Religious Teachings and Practices in the Book of Mormon
  102. Remission of Sins
  103. Repentance
  104. Resurrection
  105. Rigdon, Sidney
  106. Righteousness
  107. Sacrament Prayers
  108. Samuel the Lamanite
  109. Scripture, Interpretation within Scripture
  110. Secret Combination
  111. Seer Stones
  112. Sermon on the Mount
  113. Smith, Joseph
  114. Spaulding Manuscript
  115. Studies of the Book of Mormon
  116. Sword of Laban
  117. Three Nephites
  118. Translation of the Book of Mormon by Joseph Smith
  119. Translations of the Book of Mormon
  120. Tree of Life
  121. Urim and Thummim
  122. View of the Hebrews
  123. Visions of Joseph Smith
  124. Voices from the Dust
  125. Warfare in the Book of Mormon
  126. Wealth, Attitudes toward
  127. Whitmer, David
  128. Witnesses of the Book of Mormon
  129. Witnesses, Law of
  130. Women in the Book of Mormon
  131. Zenock
  132. Zenos
  133. Zoram

Native Americans

LDS Beliefs. The Book of Mormon, published in 1830, addresses a major message to Native Americans. Its title page states that one reason it was written was so that Native Americans today might know "what great things the Lord hath done for their fathers."

The Book of Mormon tells that a small band of Israelites under Lehi migrated from Jerusalem to the Western Hemisphere about 600 B.C. Upon Lehi's death his family divided into two opposing factions, one under Lehi's oldest son, Laman (see Lamanites), and the other under a younger son, Nephi1 (see Nephites).

During the thousand-year history narrated in the Book of Mormon, Lehi's descendants went through several phases of splitting, warring, accommodating, merging, and splitting again. At first, just as God had prohibited the Israelites from intermarrying with the Canaanites in the ancient promised land (Ex. 34:16; Deut. 7:3), the Nephites were forbidden to marry the Lamanites with their dark skin (2 Ne. 5:23; Alma 3:8—9). But as large Lamanite populations accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ and were numbered among the Nephites in the first century B.C., skin color ceased to be a distinguishing characteristic. After the visitations of the resurrected Christ, there were no distinctions among any kind of "ites" for some two hundred years. But then unbelievers arose and called themselves Lamanites to distinguish themselves from the Nephites or believers (4 Ne. 1:20).

The concluding chapters of the Book of Mormon describe a calamitous war. About A.D. 231, old enmities reemerged and two hostile populations formed (4 Ne. 1:35—39), eventually resulting in the annihilation of the Nephites. The Lamanites, from whom many present-day Native Americans descend, remained to inhabit the American continent. Peoples of other extractions also migrated there.

The Book of Mormon contains many promises and prophecies about the future directed to these survivors. For example, Lehi's grandson Enos prayed earnestly to God on behalf of his kinsmen, the Lamanites. He was promised by the Lord that Nephite records would be kept so that they could be "brought forth at some future day unto the Lamanites, that, perhaps, they might be brought unto salvation" (Enos 1:13).

The role of Native Americans in the events of the last days is noted by several Book of Mormon prophets. Nephi1prophesied that in the last days the Lamanites would accept the gospel and become a "pure and a delightsome people" (2 Ne. 30:6). Likewise, it was revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith that the Lamanites will at some future time "blossom as the rose" (D&C 49:24).

After Jesus' resurrection in Jerusalem, he appeared to the more righteous Lamanites and Nephites left after massive destruction and prophesied that their seed eventually "shall dwindle in unbelief because of iniquity" (3 Ne. 21:5). He also stated that if any people "will repent and hearken unto my words, and harden not their hearts, I will establish my church among them, and they shall come in unto the covenant and be numbered among this the remnant of Jacob [the descendants of the Book of Mormon peoples], unto whom I have given this land for their inheritance"; together with others of the house of Israel, they will build the New Jerusalem (3 Ne. 21:22—23). The Book of Mormon teaches that the descendants of Lehi are heirs to the blessings of Abraham and will receive the blessings promised to the house of Israel.

The Lamanite Mission (1830—1831). Doctrine and a commandment from the Lord motivated the Latter-day Saints to introduce the Book of Mormon to the Native Americans and teach them of their heritage and the gospel of Jesus Christ. Just a few months after the organization of the Church, four elders were called to preach to Native Americans living on the frontier west of the Missouri River.

The missionaries visited the Cattaraugus in New York, the Wyandots in Ohio, and the Shawnees and Delawares in the unorganized territories (now Kansas). Members of these tribes were receptive to the story of the Restoration. Unfortunately, federal Indian agents worrying about Indian unrest feared that the missionaries were inciting the tribes to resist the government and ordered the missionaries to leave, alleging that they were "disturbers of the peace" (Arrington and Bitton, p. 146). LDS pro—Native American beliefs continued to be a factor in the tensions between Latter-day Saints and their neighbors in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, which eventually led to persecution and expulsion of the Latter-day Saints from Missouri in 1838—1839 and from Illinois in 1846.

Relations in the Great Basin. When the Latter-day Saints arrived in the Great Salt Lake Valley in 1847, they found several Native American tribal groups there and in adjacent valleys. The Church members soon had to weigh their need to put the limited arable land into production for the establishment of Zion against their obligation to accommodate their Native American neighbors and bring them the unique message in the Book of Mormon.

Brigham Young taught that kindness and fairness were the best means to coexist with Native Americans and, like many other white Americans at the time, he hoped eventually to assimilate the Indians entirely into the mainstream culture. He admonished settlers to extend friendship, trade fairly, teach white man's ways, and generously share what they had. Individuals and Church groups gave, where possible, from their limited supplies of food, clothing, and livestock. But the rapid expansion of LDS settlers along the Wasatch Range, their preoccupation with building Zion, and the spread of European diseases unfortunately contravened many of these conciliatory efforts.

A dominating factor leading to resentment and hostility was the extremely limited availability of life-sustaining resources in the Great Basin, which in the main was marginal desert and mountain terrain dotted with small valley oases of green. Although Native Americans had learned to survive, it was an extremely delicate balance that was destroyed by the arrival of the Latter-day Saints in 1847. The tribal chiefs who initially welcomed the Mormons soon found themselves and their people being dispossessed by what appeared to them to be a never-ending horde, and in time they responded by raiding LDS-owned stock and fields, which resources were all that remained in the oases which once supported plants and wildlife that were the staples of the Native American diet. The Latter-day Saints, like others invading the western frontier, concerned with survival in the wilderness, responded at times with force.

An important factor in the conflict was the vast cultural gap between the two peoples. Native Americans in the Great Basin concentrated on scratching for survival in a barren land. Their uncanny survival skills could have been used by the Mormons in 1848, when drought and pestilence nearly destroyed the pioneers' first crops and famine seriously threatened their survival.

The Utes, Shoshones, and other tribal groups in the basin had little interest in being farmers or cowherders, or living in stuffy sod or log houses. They preferred their hunter-gatherer way of life under the open sky and often resisted, sometimes even scoffed at, the acculturation proffered them. Nor did they have a concept of land ownership or the accumulation of property. They shared both the land and its bounty—a phenomenon that European Americans have never fully understood. The culture gap all but precluded any significant acculturation or accommodation.

Within a few years, LDS settlers inhabited most of the arable land in Utah. Native Americans, therefore, had few options: They could leave, they could give up their own culture and assimilate with the Mormons, they could beg, they could take what bounty they could get and pay the consequences, or they could fight. Conflict was inevitable. Conflict mixed with accommodation prevailed in Utah for many years. Violent clashes occurred between Mormons and Native Americans in 1849, 1850 (Chief Sowiette), 1853 (Chief Walkara), 1860, and 1865—1868 (Chief Black Hawk)—all for the same primary reasons and along similar lines. Conflict subsided, and finally disappeared, only when most of the surviving Native Americans were forced onto reservations by the United States government.

Still, the LDS hand of fellowship was continually extended. Leonard Arrington accurately comments that "the most prominent theme in Brigham's Indian policy in the 1850s was patience and forbearance . . . . He continued to emphasize always being ready, using all possible means to conciliate the Indians, and acting only on the defensive" (Arrington, p. 217). Farms for the Native Americans were established as early as 1851, both to raise crops for their use and to teach them how to farm; but most of the "Indian farms" failed owing to a lack of commitment on both sides as well as to insufficient funding. LDS emissaries (such as Jacob Hamblin, Dudley Leavitt, and Dimmick Huntington) continued, however, to serve Native American needs, and missionaries continued to approach them in Utah and in bordering states. Small numbers of Utes, Shoshones, Paiutes, Gosiutes, and Navajos assimilated into the mainstream culture, and some of that number became Latter-day Saints. But overall, reciprocal contact and accommodation were minimal. By the turn of the century, contact was almost nil because most Native Americans lived on reservations far removed from LDS communities. Their contact with whites was mainly limited to government soldiers and agency officials and to non-Mormon Christian missionaries.

Relations in Recent Times. Beginning in the 1940s, the Church reemphasized reaching out to Native Americans. The Navajo-Zuni Mission, later named the Southwest Indian Mission, was created in 1943. It was followed by the Northern Indian Mission, headquartered in South Dakota. Eventually, missionaries were placed on many Indian reservations. The missionaries not only proselytize, but also assist Native Americans with their farming, ranching, and community development. Other Lamanite missions, including several in Central and South America and in Polynesia, have also been opened. Large numbers of North American Indians have migrated off reservations, and today over half of all Indians live in cities. In response, some formerly all-Indian missions have merged with those serving members of all racial and ethnic groups living in a given geographical area.

An Indian seminary program was initiated to teach the gospel to Native American children on reservations, in their own languages if necessary. Initially, Native American children of all ages were taught the principles of the gospel in schools adjacent to federal public schools on reservations and in remote Indian communities. The Indian seminary program has now been integrated within the regular seminary system, and Indian children in the ninth through twelfth grades attend seminary, just as non-Indian children do.

The Indian Student Placement Services (ISPS) seeks to improve the educational attainment of Native American children by placing member Indian children with LDS families during the school year. Foster families, selected because of their emotional, financial, and spiritual stability, pay all expenses of the Indian child, who lives with a foster family during the nine-month school year and spends the summer on the reservation with his or her natural family. Generally, the children enter the program at a fairly young age and return year after year to the same foster family until they graduate from high school.

From a small beginning in 1954, the program peaked in 1970 with an enrollment of nearly 5,000 students. The development of more adequate schools on reservations has since then reduced the need for the program and the number of participants has declined. In 1990, about 500 students participated. More than 70,000 Native American youngsters have participated in ISPS, and evaluations have shown that participation significantly increased their educational attainment.

In the 1950s, Elder Spencer W. Kimball, then an apostle, encouraged Brigham Young University to take an active interest in Native American education and to help solve economic and social problems. Scholarships were established, and a program to help Indian students adjust to university life was inaugurated. During the 1970s more than 500 Indian students, representing seventy-one tribes, were enrolled each year. But enrollment has declined, so a new program for Indian students is being developed that will increase the recruiting of Native American students to BYU and raise the percentage who receive a college degree. The Native American Educational Outreach Program at BYU presents educational seminars to tribal leaders and Indian youth across North America. It also offers scholarships. American Indian Services, another outreach program originally affiliated with BYU, provides adult education and technical and financial assistance to Indian communities. In 1989, American Indian Services was transferred from BYU to the Lehi Foundation, which continues this activity.

In 1975, George P. Lee, a full-blooded Navajo and an early ISPS participant, was appointed as a General Authority. He was the first Indian to achieve this status and served faithfully for more than ten years. Elder Lee became convinced that the Church was neglecting its mission to the Lamanites, and when he voiced strong disapproval of Church leaders, he was excommunicated in 1989.

The Church has always had a strong commitment to preaching the gospel to Native Americans and assisting individuals, families, communities, and tribes to improve their education, health, and religious well-being. Programs vary from time to time as conditions and needs change, but the underlying beliefs and goodwill of Latter-day Saints toward these people remain firm and vibrant.

Bibliography

Arrington, Leonard J. Brigham Young: American Moses. New York, 1985.
Arrington, Leonard J., and Davis Bitton. The Mormon Experience: A History of the Latter-day Saints. New York, 1979.
Chadwick, Bruce A., Stan L. Albrecht, and Howard M. Bahr. "Evaluation of an Indian Student Placement Program." Social Casework 67, no. 9 (1986): 515—24.
Walker, Ronald W. "Toward a Reconstruction of Mormon and Indian Relations, 1847—1877." BYU Studies 29 (Fall 1989): 23—42.

Bruce A. Chadwick
Thomas Garrow